CLEVELAND PARK DC NEIGHBORHOOD

CLEVELAND PARK NEIGHBORHOOD

Cleveland Park DC Neighborhood Profile

Cleveland Park DC combines the bustle of Connecticut Ave with the serenity of tree-lined streets and Rock Creek Park. You’ll find history, architecture with charm and character, some serious mansions and a Metro station in this engaging neighborhood.

WELCOME TO CLEVELAND PARK DC

TRANSPORTATION IN CLEVELAND PARK DC

Cleveland Park is a very walkable neighborhood with a WalkScore of 85. Cleveland Park offers good public transportation with a TransitScore of 65, and is bikeable with a BikeScore of 62.

Metro Station

The closest metro station is the Cleveland Park station on the Red line.

Buses

There are approximately 12 Bus Lines running throughout Cleveland Park.

Bikeshare

There are 3 Capital Bikeshare stations in Cleveland Park DC.

ZipCar

There are approximately 4 ZipCar locations near Cleveland Park DC.

CLEVELAND PARK DC NIEGHBORHOOD SNAPSHOTS

Cleveland Park is an urban village with a little retro flair and a lot of picturesque appeal.

Catch the matinee at the Uptown. Free range Fido in Rock Creek Park. Coo over adorable animals at the National Zoo. Take gargoyle selfies at the National Cathedral. Meander along tree lined streets and ponder life’s mysteries. Sip a latte in the garden at Firehook. Pick up your favorite vintage at Weygandt Wines. Open the door to a different era at Hillwood Estate. Brunch on duck & waffles at Ardeo + Bordeo. Summit the jungle gym at Macomb St Playground. Cannonball into the Cleveland Park Club pool. Hold hands and watch the sun set over Ordway Street. Fall in love with your life.

CLEVELAND PARK DC NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY

General Uriah Forrest, an aide-de-camp of George Washington, built an estate called Rosedale (3501 Newark Street) in 1793, when he began serving as a Congressman from Maryland. The estate was later home to the Youth For Understanding international exchange student organization. In 2002, the Rosedale grounds were placed in a public conservancy, and the farmhouse (said to be the oldest house in Washington), returned to residential use. Other estates followed. Gardiner Greene Hubbard, first president of the National Geographic Society, built the colonial Georgian revival “Twin Oaks” on 50 acres in 1888. It was used as a summer home by the Hubbard family, including Alexander Graham Bell. “Twin Oaks” is currently home to the diplomatic mission of the Republic of China on Taiwan. Tregaron, present-day home of the Washington International School, is a Georgian house built in 1912.
The neighborhood took its name from President Grover Cleveland, who bought a stone farmhouse directly opposite Rosedale after 1886, and remodeled it into a Queen Anne style summer estate. There is some argument over whether it was named  “Oak View,” “Oak Hill” or “Red Top.” ). When Cleveland was not re-elected in 1888, he sold the property and the Oak View subdivision was platted in 1890. The Cleveland Heights subdivision was platted around the same time,  and the Cleveland Park subdivision shortly thereafter.
Early large-scale development in Cleveland Park was boosted by its relatively high elevation. Like Burleith,  the neighborhood provided lower temperatures and breezy relief from the hot lowlands of Washington. Most of the houses built during this period were conceived as summer residences in the time before air-conditioning. As such, they included features such as wide porches, large windows, and long, overhanging eaves.
Cleveland Park is another example of a Washington ‘street car neighborhood,’ but owes most of its success to its predecessor, the Rock Creek Railway, built on Connecticut Avenue in 1892. Once Cleveland Park was connected to downtown Washington, the second phase of its development surged with the streetcar. The Cleveland Park Company oversaw construction on numerous plots starting in 1894.
Most single family dwellings in Cleveland Park were built between 1894 and 1930. During the first construction phase (1894 to 1901), the homes were individually designed by local architects and builders, resulting in an eclectic mix of architectural styles. Robert Thompson Head, the most prolific architect for the Cleveland Park Company, favored Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, Japanese, and Prairie styles. Waddy Wood introduced the first Shingle and Mission Revival homes in the neighborhood. During this period all of the houses were constructed of wood, most adorned with turrets, towers, oriel and bay windows, steep gables with half timbering, tall pilastered chimneys, Palladian windows, Georgian porches, Richardsonian arches, decorative brackets and Adamesque swags. The houses with their varied verandas were situated on generous lots and set well back from the street.
Bankruptcy of the Cleveland Park Company in 1905 and the Great Depression in the 1930s slowed development in the area. During these times, much smaller houses of of different styles were built, often next to one another. The result is a neighborhood noted for its architectural diversity. Represented are nearly all the popular architectural styles of the late 19th and early 20th centuries; Queen Anne, Shingle, Colonial Revival, Dutch Colonial Revival, Mission Revival, Tudor Revival, Craftsman foursquares and bungalows, as well as important modern houses, including one by I.M. Pei and several by Waldron Faulkner and his son Winthrop Faulkner.
Along with its architecture and treed streets, the neighborhood is known for the Rosedale Conservancy and its off-leash dog park, the historic Art Deco Uptown Theater, the William L. Slayton House and “Park and Shop,” one of the earliest strip malls c 1930.

CLEVELAND PARK DC MARKET DATA

The icon link takes you to our Market Data page. Chock-full of the latest Washington DC neighborhood statistics by zip code. Find out how Cleveland Park is selling!

CLEVELAND PARK DC SCHOOLS

Eaton Elementary

Public • Grades PK-5
470 students • 14 student/teacher

Deal Middle School

Public • Grades 6-8
1248 students • 14 student/teacher

Wilson High School

Public • Grades 9-12
1696 students • 14 student/teacher
For a full, updated list of schools, see EBIS. School data from SchoolDigger

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Neighborhood information is deemed accurate, but not guaranteed. Subject to change without notice.
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